Asylum System Faces Collapse as North African Immigrants Flock to Britain

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Asylum System Faces Collapse as North African Immigrants Flock to Britain

Post by Guest on Wed May 04, 2011 11:04 am

The current conflicts and upheavals in North Africa have the potential to cause a complete breakdown in the UK’s asylum system, a think tank report has revealed.

Tens of thousands of immigrants have already headed to Europe to escape unrest in countries such as Libya, Tunisia and Egypt, and many have set up camp near the Eurostar terminal in Paris, with the aim of travelling to Britain.

The Migration Watch UK think tank has warned that, if many of the migrants head to Britain, the country’s asylum system will be put under pressure not seen since the early 2000s, which, when combined with recent government cutbacks to border force funding, could prove catastrophic.

Migration Watch said that there is now a clear risk of a massive inflow of economic migrants to the EU, many of whom will claim asylum.

The watchdog’s press release stated: “The asylum system, already creaking, could collapse under the weight of numbers as it did in 2000–2002 when a peak flow left the Home Office hiding half a million files in a warehouse.

Some migrants will be genuine refugees but many will be economic migrants.”

Anyone who sets foot in the UK and claims asylum has the right under the 1951 Refugee Convention to have his case heard and also has a right of appeal if refused.

Applicants are supported by the taxpayer throughout the process, which takes months and often years.

“The UK’s record in removing those whose cases eventually fail is extremely poor,” said Migration Watch.

A flood of nearly 26,000 Tunisians (and hundreds of Libyans) began to arrive on the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa two months ago.

They were subsequently moved to mainland Italy and given six-month residency visas.

Under the Schengen border treaty, they are permitted to travel to most European countries.

Although the UK and Ireland are excluded from the agreement, many are nevertheless expected to come here claiming to be asylum seekers.

One thousand North Africans have already made it to Paris and have set up camps near the Gare du Nord station, where trains leave hourly for the Channel ports in England.

The mayor of the northerly Italian border town of Ventimiglia, which is being swamped by Tunisian immigrants trying to get into France, warned that this was just the tip of the iceberg: “There are 520,000 Libyans waiting on the Libyan border with Tunisia because of the war there.

There are another 720,000 Egyptians at their border hoping to get to Tunisia, too.

Do you think just one European country, Italy, can resolve these kinds of immigration problems? The Tunisians are just the start.”

Some of the countries of North Africa are already struggling with large and rapidly growing populations.

Youth unemployment rates range from 18 per cent in Morocco to 31 per cent in Tunisia.

Overall some three million young people are out of work in Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia.

Figures are not available for Libya.

EU Ministers will meet on 11 May to consider what might be done about the unfolding crisis. Rolling Eyes

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Re: Asylum System Faces Collapse as North African Immigrants Flock to Britain

Post by victorismyhero on Wed May 04, 2011 6:05 pm

MrDoodles wrote:The current conflicts and upheavals in North Africa have the potential to cause a complete breakdown in the UK’s asylum system, a think tank report has revealed.

Tens of thousands of immigrants have already headed to Europe to escape unrest in countries such as Libya, Tunisia and Egypt, and many have set up camp near the Eurostar terminal in Paris, with the aim of travelling to Britain.

The Migration Watch UK think tank has warned that, if many of the migrants head to Britain, the country’s asylum system will be put under pressure not seen since the early 2000s, which, when combined with recent government cutbacks to border force funding, could prove catastrophic.

Migration Watch said that there is now a clear risk of a massive inflow of economic migrants to the EU, many of whom will claim asylum.

The watchdog’s press release stated: “The asylum system, already creaking, could collapse under the weight of numbers as it did in 2000–2002 when a peak flow left the Home Office hiding half a million files in a warehouse.

Some migrants will be genuine refugees but many will be economic migrants.”

Anyone who sets foot in the UK and claims asylum has the right under the 1951 Refugee Convention to have his case heard and also has a right of appeal if refused.

Applicants are supported by the taxpayer throughout the process, which takes months and often years.

“The UK’s record in removing those whose cases eventually fail is extremely poor,” said Migration Watch.

A flood of nearly 26,000 Tunisians (and hundreds of Libyans) began to arrive on the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa two months ago.

They were subsequently moved to mainland Italy and given six-month residency visas.

Under the Schengen border treaty, they are permitted to travel to most European countries.

Although the UK and Ireland are excluded from the agreement, many are nevertheless expected to come here claiming to be asylum seekers.

One thousand North Africans have already made it to Paris and have set up camps near the Gare du Nord station, where trains leave hourly for the Channel ports in England.

The mayor of the northerly Italian border town of Ventimiglia, which is being swamped by Tunisian immigrants trying to get into France, warned that this was just the tip of the iceberg: “There are 520,000 Libyans waiting on the Libyan border with Tunisia because of the war there.

There are another 720,000 Egyptians at their border hoping to get to Tunisia, too.

Do you think just one European country, Italy, can resolve these kinds of immigration problems? The Tunisians are just the start.”

Some of the countries of North Africa are already struggling with large and rapidly growing populations.

Youth unemployment rates range from 18 per cent in Morocco to 31 per cent in Tunisia.

Overall some three million young people are out of work in Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia.

Figures are not available for Libya.

EU Ministers will meet on 11 May to consider what might be done about the unfolding crisis. Rolling Eyes


if and i do say IF; you can find it, I suggest you watch the film "no Blade of Grass"...thought provoking and a fairly good film besides...
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