Talking about the 60s

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by dreamtime on Sun Feb 12, 2012 5:35 pm

The sadness of her death is that, presuming it was caused by drugs, she is the latest in a long line most of whom were a lot younger than she was. Billie Holliday, Janis joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Brian Jones, Jim Morrison, Mama Cass, Kurt Cobain, the list is endless. I must confess that I was not a big Whitney fan but something went out of my life when Janis and Jimi died in the same year. Fortunately their music lives on.

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by Guest on Sun Feb 12, 2012 5:49 pm

dreamtime wrote:The sadness of her death is that, presuming it was caused by drugs, she is the latest in a long line most of whom were a lot younger than she was. Billie Holliday, Janis joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Brian Jones, Jim Morrison, Mama Cass, Kurt Cobain, the list is endless. I must confess that I was not a big Whitney fan but something went out of my life when Janis and Jimi died in the same year. Fortunately their music lives on.

Oh I so have to agree with you on that one, raw, raw talent.

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by dreamtime on Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:21 am

glad you agree with me Sassy. People like us keep the faith! Very Happy Of course the saddest of all was not caused by drugs. It was, as Don McClean so eloquently put it "the day the music died". The death of Buddy Holly in a plane crash in 1959. He influenced a large number of performers who followed him such as the Beatles and the Stones.

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by Guest on Mon Feb 13, 2012 9:32 am

dreamtime wrote:glad you agree with me Sassy. People like us keep the faith! Very Happy Of course the saddest of all was not caused by drugs. It was, as Don McClean so eloquently put it "the day the music died". The death of Buddy Holly in a plane crash in 1959. He influenced a large number of performers who followed him such as the Beatles and the Stones.

I have to say, I think we have a time when it was good to be alive and we were surrounded by great music and a sense of hope. I feel so sorry for the youth of today.

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by dreamtime on Mon Feb 13, 2012 7:18 pm

I fully agree with you on both counts Sassy. In the fifties we had the birth of rock and roll, traditional jazz, skiffle (remember Lonnie Donegan?). In the sixties came the Beatles, the Stones, the Who, the Kinks, the West Coast music of the Beach Boys. Also Janis, Jimi, Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead and many more. Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page started their careers and became key players in Cream and Led Zepelin. It went on and on. And the thing was that these artists could really play instruments and then some. Things started to go wrong in the seventies and it has been more or less downhill ever since. Now we suffer from winners of talent shows and lots of girl groups and boy bands, most of whom can't actually sing. Exceptions are the late Amy Winehouse and Adele.
We also had the advantage, as you so rightly said, of living in a time of hope. Everyone got on with their neighbours, visits for cups of tea were frequent and nobody thought of locking their front doors. It is sad that the youth of to-day grow up in an era of instant gratification, moral turpitude and million pound footballers, most of whom could not hold a candle to any of the World Cup winners of 66. I could go on forever, but I won't. Very Happy

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by Guest on Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:27 pm

I certainly don't mind you going on, its not on thread, but so interesting. I often used to stay with my Uncle in Wandsworth and in one of the houses opposite Bert Weedon used to live. On bright summer days he used to sit in the window and play his guitar and we were all spellbound. I chose where I wanted to work, and started in Shell Centre in London, which had the workers club underneath. Some club! It had a full sized theatre and belonging to the drama group we used to give performances that the stars in the West End came too, boy did they envy us our dressing rooms. We had a full sized olymic swimming pool and used to watch Brian Phelps practice diving before the Olympics. There were squash and badminton courts and a bar etc. Our restaurant was top class and used by everyone, including the MD. My friend was secretary to Douglas Bader, and I worked in Personnel Planning, using the very first computer they had, which took up a whole floor and had to be humidity and heat controlled! The London Eye now stands outside the building. It was so big it had its own underground station and was linked under the road to the second building which stands by The Royal Festival Hall.

I then went out to Singapore and worked for the Royal New Zealand Air Force, helping their commanding officer to write their history in the Vietnam war. I was the only girl that worked for them, and as there were nearly 300 of them, had a fantastic time. The music of The Kinks and The Beatles etc brings it all back, in fact I went to see A Hard Days Night out there. 3 years later when I came back, I went back to Shell Centre to work and was there when Kennedy was assassinated. I had my hair done by Vidal Sassoon himself and had the most amazing times. My Nan and Grandad lived in very old council flats in Wandsworth, with people of all colours and creeds, but they never locked their front door. My Nan was Head Cook at Chelsea Football Ground, and Jimmy Greaves used to moan that she cooked too well and he had to diet! My Grandad used to take me to Millwall Football Club every Saturday, Alex Stepney was goalie who went on to play for Man U and we used to boo our own players if they played dirty, I knew just about everyone on the terrace, they all came from the area my Nan and Grandad came from, and because both of them were products of huge families, I swear most on the terraces were related to me in some way!

I am actually just starting to write my Grandparents story because it was amazing. I really must stop reminiscing because I could go on all night. Life was not perfect, but the music was, and we thought the world was going to be brilliant.

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by dreamtime on Tue Feb 14, 2012 9:39 am

You have had a very interesting life Sassy, and met some fascinating people. Bert Weedon was a brilliant musician whose work was not as highly thought of as it should have been. The school I went to, Salesian College, was in Battersea so not too far from where your grandparents lived. After I left there my mates and I used to go "up West" of a week-end. We went to Cafe des Artistes which was eventually closed because of drugs, and to the Cellar in Greek Street where the jazz musicians used to come and jam after they finished playing at their own clubs. We usually got the train back to Clapham Junction first thing on Sunday morning. We also frequently went to Eel Pie Island in the Thames where there was a jazz club in a barn. Those of course were the "hippy" days and clothes were old, ripped jeans and a sweater that came down to the knees. It was still quite obvious who was male and who was female. There was no "feminism" around and blokes were quite happy to treat females as the ladies they were, and females were very happy with this.
When i joined the Royal Navy I was part of the time in an "honour guard" used for visiting VIPs. As such we met Prince Philip and others. One occasion which still brings a smile to my face is when we were sent to Broadlands, the home of Lord Mountbatten. When we arrived we were shown around the house by his manservant and given tea and snacks.Mountbatten, who was then CIGS, was due to arrive from London by helicopter for the week-end, so we formed up outside to await his arrival. When he stepped down he was met by Lady Pamela, then made a point of walking over to us, in full dress uniform, and thanking us for being there. What a man!

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by Guest on Tue Feb 14, 2012 9:53 am

dreamtime wrote:You have had a very interesting life Sassy, and met some fascinating people. Bert Weedon was a brilliant musician whose work was not as highly thought of as it should have been. The school I went to, Salesian College, was in Battersea so not too far from where your grandparents lived. After I left there my mates and I used to go "up West" of a week-end. We went to Cafe des Artistes which was eventually closed because of drugs, and to the Cellar in Greek Street where the jazz musicians used to come and jam after they finished playing at their own clubs. We usually got the train back to Clapham Junction first thing on Sunday morning. We also frequently went to Eel Pie Island in the Thames where there was a jazz club in a barn. Those of course were the "hippy" days and clothes were old, ripped jeans and a sweater that came down to the knees. It was still quite obvious who was male and who was female. There was no "feminism" around and blokes were quite happy to treat females as the ladies they were, and females were very happy with this.
When i joined the Royal Navy I was part of the time in an "honour guard" used for visiting VIPs. As such we met Prince Philip and others. One occasion which still brings a smile to my face is when we were sent to Broadlands, the home of Lord Mountbatten. When we arrived we were shown around the house by his manservant and given tea and snacks.Mountbatten, who was then CIGS, was due to arrive from London by helicopter for the week-end, so we formed up outside to await his arrival. When he stepped down he was met by Lady Pamela, then made a point of walking over to us, in full dress uniform, and thanking us for being there. What a man!

Oh My Word, I remember The Cellar in Greek Street, and Eel Pie Island. I used to go to Ronnie Scotts as well. The sweaters were called 'Sloppy Joes' and not exactly sexy lol! I met Lord Mountbatten as well, when I was in Singapore I used to volunteer at a Red Cross Children's Home, were the children had disabilities and in a lot of cases had been abandoned. He came for a visit and had a lot of fun with those kids, who were amazing, always cheerful. By far the nicest, gentlest person I have every met was the Duchess of Kent when she was still performing royal duties. I was volunteering in a Barnardo's School in Taunton, and she came. I have never met anyone so full of love. There was one girl who was very big and strong, but could be violent on occasions. The Duchess was told that although she normally gave children a hug, it would not be advisable with this girl. She totally ignored it and said afterwards that the girl probably needed a hug more than anyone else, and I quite agreed with her. There was a young boy who had been born perfectly normal, but larking about on a factory roof had fallen through, and the only way he had of communicating was a special computer that would respond to his slight finger movement, but he would not use it. She went and sat with him, and by the end of her time he was using it. She had researched which football teams the boys supported and bought them all strips of their favourite players and had special presents for the girls, I learned later that it was all of her own bat, not part of the itinery. A truly lovely lady.

PS Clapham Junction was my port of call as well, do you remember Arding & Hobbs and wasn't it the building that all the rioters were shown going in last year. My uncle still lives near there and went down and asked the police what they were doing just letting them get away with it.

PPS As this has gone right off topic, do you mind if I move our bit to Chat?

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by Guest on Tue Feb 14, 2012 6:06 pm

Don't remember creating this topic...

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by Guest on Tue Feb 14, 2012 6:25 pm

David1 wrote:Don't remember creating this topic...

You didn't love, you created the Whitney Houston one, I copied onto here as it ended with Dreamtime and I reminiscing and took the first posts out. When I went back to the Whitney Houston on in General, it had gone and I had not deleted it. I put and Whitney thread up again in General and explained what had happened. So sorry.

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by Guest on Tue Feb 14, 2012 6:27 pm

sassy1261 wrote:

You didn't love, you created the Whitney Houston one, I copied onto here as it ended with Dreamtime and I reminiscing and took the first posts out. When I went back to the Whitney Houston on in General, it had gone and I had not deleted it. I put and Whitney thread up again in General and explained what had happened. So sorry.
No worries xxx

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Re: Talking about the 60s

Post by Guest on Wed Feb 15, 2012 6:06 pm

The thread is still here Dreamtime, bumping it in case you can't find it!

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