New mothers told it's better to go back to work

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New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Thu Jul 21, 2011 6:28 pm

Children whose mothers return to work within the first year after birth are less likely to fight with their classmates or become anxious than if their mothers stay at home, according to new research.


UCL study: Children of mothers who work full time are less disruptive Photo: REUTERS

Despite concerns that young children suffer if they are left in childcare during the early years of their lives, academics at University College London found that there were “no detrimental effects” resulting from mothers going back to work. The best arrangement for children’s emotional stability is a home in which both parents are in paid jobs, partly because mothers who work are less likely to be depressed, the study concluded.

The findings follow warnings that children’s health and emotional wellbeing can suffer if their mothers go back to work too soon. According to earlier studies, the children of working mothers are more likely to develop bad eating habits, take less exercise and become overweight than those of stay-at-home mothers.

The United Nations Children’s Fund warned that children could be suffering because maternity leave provision in the UK is “inadequate”, while a separate international study found earlier this year that British working mothers spent just 81 minutes per day looking after their children.

However, the latest report, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, suggested that parents who are struggling to combine paid work with family life need not fear that they are undermining their children’s emotional wellbeing. Dr Anne McMunn, the lead researcher in the study, said mothers who worked full time were least likely to have children with emotional or behavioural problems, such as hyperactivity, aggression, tantrums or becoming worried or “clingy”.

“Some studies have suggested that whether or not mothers work in the first year of a child's life can be particularly important for later outcomes,” Dr McMunn said. “In this study we did not see any evidence for a longer-term detrimental influence on child behaviour of mothers working during the child's first year of life. Children whose mothers were not working at all had the most behaviour difficulties, followed by children whose mothers were in part-time work,” she said.

The academics analysed results from the Millennium Cohort Study, which tracks the development of almost 19,000 children born in 2000 and 2001, to find the links between parents’ working patterns and children’s social wellbeing. The report found children of single mothers and those in homes where both parents were unemployed were “much more likely” to behave badly by the age of five.

Dr McMunn said mothers who were out of work were also more likely to be depressed and to have children with social and emotional problems. “The mothers who were not working were more likely to be depressed,” she said. “When we include that in our models it does explain some of those increased behaviour problems in children.”

Where only one parent worked, there were significant “role model” influences on children’s emotional wellbeing.

Boys growing up in homes where the mother was the breadwinner were more likely to show signs of aggression or unhappiness at the age of five than boys in households where both parents were working. The opposite was true for girls. In traditional male-breadwinner homes, girls were more likely to have behavioural problems than in families in which both parents worked.

Dr McMunn suggested that ministers should develop policies to help both parents stay in employment. “One message would be that the best situation for children was two parent families where both parents were working,” she said. “Maternal employment and parental employment is good for families and children. If we can find ways to support families so that both parents can work and still combine child rearing and family life, then it is probably going to have a positive effect for children in terms of their socio-emotional behaviour.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/8652948/New-mothers-told-its-better-to-go-back-to-work.html


Very few Mum's are lucky enough to be able to choose to stay at home or go back to work after having children. Working parents should receive as much help and assistance as possible I love you

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Re: New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:06 pm

Feelthelove wrote:Children whose mothers return to work within the first year after birth are less likely to fight with their classmates or become anxious than if their mothers stay at home, according to new research.


UCL study: Children of mothers who work full time are less disruptive Photo: REUTERS

Despite concerns that young children suffer if they are left in childcare during the early years of their lives, academics at University College London found that there were “no detrimental effects” resulting from mothers going back to work. The best arrangement for children’s emotional stability is a home in which both parents are in paid jobs, partly because mothers who work are less likely to be depressed, the study concluded.

The findings follow warnings that children’s health and emotional wellbeing can suffer if their mothers go back to work too soon. According to earlier studies, the children of working mothers are more likely to develop bad eating habits, take less exercise and become overweight than those of stay-at-home mothers.

The United Nations Children’s Fund warned that children could be suffering because maternity leave provision in the UK is “inadequate”, while a separate international study found earlier this year that British working mothers spent just 81 minutes per day looking after their children.

However, the latest report, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, suggested that parents who are struggling to combine paid work with family life need not fear that they are undermining their children’s emotional wellbeing. Dr Anne McMunn, the lead researcher in the study, said mothers who worked full time were least likely to have children with emotional or behavioural problems, such as hyperactivity, aggression, tantrums or becoming worried or “clingy”.

“Some studies have suggested that whether or not mothers work in the first year of a child's life can be particularly important for later outcomes,” Dr McMunn said. “In this study we did not see any evidence for a longer-term detrimental influence on child behaviour of mothers working during the child's first year of life. Children whose mothers were not working at all had the most behaviour difficulties, followed by children whose mothers were in part-time work,” she said.

The academics analysed results from the Millennium Cohort Study, which tracks the development of almost 19,000 children born in 2000 and 2001, to find the links between parents’ working patterns and children’s social wellbeing. The report found children of single mothers and those in homes where both parents were unemployed were “much more likely” to behave badly by the age of five.

Dr McMunn said mothers who were out of work were also more likely to be depressed and to have children with social and emotional problems. “The mothers who were not working were more likely to be depressed,” she said. “When we include that in our models it does explain some of those increased behaviour problems in children.”

Where only one parent worked, there were significant “role model” influences on children’s emotional wellbeing.

Boys growing up in homes where the mother was the breadwinner were more likely to show signs of aggression or unhappiness at the age of five than boys in households where both parents were working. The opposite was true for girls. In traditional male-breadwinner homes, girls were more likely to have behavioural problems than in families in which both parents worked.

Dr McMunn suggested that ministers should develop policies to help both parents stay in employment. “One message would be that the best situation for children was two parent families where both parents were working,” she said. “Maternal employment and parental employment is good for families and children. If we can find ways to support families so that both parents can work and still combine child rearing and family life, then it is probably going to have a positive effect for children in terms of their socio-emotional behaviour.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/8652948/New-mothers-told-its-better-to-go-back-to-work.html


Very few Mum's are lucky enough to be able to choose to stay at home or go back to work after having children. Working parents should receive as much help and assistance as possible I love you

Why pay someone else to look after your children? little ones change and grow so fast and that time can never be replaced....recently I heard a mother -law talking about her daughter in law..who was returning to work and putting her 6 week old into a nursery from 8 till 6.... and it was'nt for financial reasons.

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Re: New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:13 pm

Many people can't afford to stay at home Red Sad

They feel guilty and miss out on so much. We're all different I guess and some Mum's would go crazy being at home.

I haven't any little ones as you know but I couldn't have afforded to stay at home. If either of us had stayed home it would have been my hubby. I'd have been very jealous Crying or Very sad

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Re: New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:19 pm

Feelthelove wrote:Many people can't afford to stay at home Red Sad

They feel guilty and miss out on so much. We're all different I guess and some Mum's would go crazy being at home.

I haven't any little ones as you know but I couldn't have afforded to stay at home. If either of us had stayed home it would have been my hubby. I'd have been very jealous Crying or Very sad

I see a lot of people who have two cars, holidays, designer clothes..etc...sorry FTL, lot of people have their priorties all wrong....I do understand what you mean about financies...but, a lot of people now are to materialistic...

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Re: New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:39 pm

I would agree with you Red, I stayed at home from the moment my eldest was born until my youngest was 12 and I would not have missed a day of it, we had a wonderful time. It was really hard living on one lot of money and paying a mortgage, but I grew my own veg, made my own bread etc, we never had processed food, I made soups etc. I bought an old piano and taught the children music and they all played different instruments, much better then I could, I had a wall painted with blackboard paint and we used to draw and tell stories and emptied the library most weeks. My eldest daughter could read by the time she was 3 and bought herself Wind in the Willows with her birthday money that year. It was a lovely, lovely time. In the end I had to go back to work because costs were rising and even being really frugal we could not cope. We had nothing apart from the house in the way of material things and it set my 'career' down the pan, but I would never have swopped with anyone.

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Re: New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:45 pm

Its become a catch 22 though isn't it...
Personally I don't believe in a mother leaving her kids to go to work in the first place anyway...
The financial aspect is purely resultant OF that scenario...
(OK maybe its too late BUT.....?)
I do NOT believe the findings as stated regarding kids NOT fighting one another in class/whatever anyway...
In my day it was extremely RARE for mothers of schoolkids to go out to work, and I can say that in MY school of 640 boys from what is today classed as a socially deprived area and were REAL hardnuts in general...it was EXTREMELY RARE to have lads fighting in class anyway, as the masters would NOT allow anything of that nature in school, NOR would our parents...!

Today kids seem only to be fighting about not knowing if they are gay or if the teacher is, whether they are liked ,or are classed as too fat, or being racially abused...the others just get knifed by some kids from overseas ...whereas our lot had a 'one to one' in the local park after school and that was that!

I totally agree about people today being far TOO materialistic and certainly are ignorant/naive regarding lifes priorities.
THEY call it living on credit...I suggest its really living in DEBT!

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Re: New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Thu Jul 21, 2011 9:04 pm

What complete and utter tosh!!! Twisted Evil

How the hell can it be better for a child to be looked after by a anyone else other than one of it's parents??? Question Mad

However, if it weren't for the LibLabCon making it necessary for mothers to go back to work as soon as possible, just to keep a roof over their heads, they would have a choice whether they did or not! Sad

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Re: New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Fri Jul 22, 2011 12:04 pm

redcorvette wrote:

I see a lot of people who have two cars, holidays, designer clothes..etc...sorry FTL, lot of people have their priorties all wrong....I do understand what you mean about financies...but, a lot of people now are to materialistic...

I agree Red, if you have children raising them the best way you possibly can should be your first and foremost priority (easy for me to say I know as I don't have kids!).

However, many Mum's have to return to work to keep food on the table and a roof overhead. It requires a dual income. Personally I think hard working parents are better role models for children than those who are at home but living on benefits.

It's a very complicated issue. If I'd had children and I could have afforded to stay at home I would have done. However, I certainly wouldn't have liked anyone telling me that I should be at home or making me feel guilty if I had chosen to go to work.

I do think that children who go to nursery benefit from greater interaction with other children but on the other side of the coin, children who have a parent at home with them benefit from that one on one attention. A balance between the two perhaps would be the ideal.

Either way, children are precious and should be treated as such. Being a good parent is a tough job, if only they came with full instructions Very Happy







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Re: New mothers told it's better to go back to work

Post by Guest on Fri Jul 22, 2011 4:52 pm

sassy1261 wrote:I would agree with you Red, I stayed at home from the moment my eldest was born until my youngest was 12 and I would not have missed a day of it, we had a wonderful time. It was really hard living on one lot of money and paying a mortgage, but I grew my own veg, made my own bread etc, we never had processed food, I made soups etc. I bought an old piano and taught the children music and they all played different instruments, much better then I could, I had a wall painted with blackboard paint and we used to draw and tell stories and emptied the library most weeks. My eldest daughter could read by the time she was 3 and bought herself Wind in the Willows with her birthday money that year. It was a lovely, lovely time. In the end I had to go back to work because costs were rising and even being really frugal we could not cope. We had nothing apart from the house in the way of material things and it set my 'career' down the pan, but I would never have swopped with anyone.

I worked part-time when my boys went to nursery....takes me back you talking about going to the library and music classes....and for me the dreaded Saturday mornings training and Sundays driving all over the place to different football events....and still now in the football season it's muddy smelly boots, bits of turf and mud....being brought home...kids now a days have so much...dare I say to much..

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