Cameron admits foreign aid has been wasted, yet plans to increase handouts by 34%

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Cameron admits foreign aid has been wasted, yet plans to increase handouts by 34%

Post by MrDoodles on Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:46 am

David Cameron has admitted that billions of British foreign aid money has been ‘wasted’ yet defends its increase to £12 billion a year – meanwhile, polls show the majority of Britons want to see foreign aid and EU subsidies cut.

Speaking at the Pan-African university in Lagos on Tuesday, Cameron dismissed what he called ‘aid sceptics’’ views as ‘wrong’ and said foreign aid is ‘essential’.

In rather an understatement, the prime minister said: ‘There are some people back at home who don't like Britain's aid commitment.’

He continued: ‘They look at where some of our aid money has gone in recent years... on the wrong priorities and into the wrong hands. And think – this is all being wasted. They have a point – some of our money has been wasted.

‘The aid sceptics are wrong. Aid is essential. It can work, and we are making it work.’

Mr Cameron argued that the solution is not to cut aid but to change ‘the way it is delivered’. One way of doing this, he said, would be direct mobile-phoned-based payments to African farmers.

The ConDem regime has recently said it will donate almost £90 million to help victims of the Horn of Africa drought.

Neither South Africa nor Nigeria – two of the continent's biggest economies – has offered any aid to the Horn of Africa. The only African country to have done so is North Sudan.

The international aid budget is the only area of government spending that will rise significantly over the next few years, as frontline services in Britain are slashed across the board.

Foreign aid will increase to more than 12 billion pounds by 2014, making the UK one of the few countries in the world to meet its ‘international aid commitments’.

Meanwhile, back in Britain, a YouGov poll has shown the population’s continued opposition to foreign aid (and continued agreement with British National Party policies).

Fifty-seven percent of people surveyed in the ‘British Attitudes Towards the UK’s International Priorities’ poll believed Britain is sending too much aid to other countries, while only seven percent thought we send ‘too little’.

Fifty-seven percent also think that much development assistance is wasted and should be ‘radically reduced’.

Only 18 percent of people thought foreign aid serves Britain’s national interests around the world.

Again in line with British National Party policy, 64 percent said we contribute too much money to the EU, while just two percent said we give too little.

Seventy-seven percent of participants said they want our troops out of Afghanistan, while only 17 percent said they want them to remain. Sixty-four percent said our government is not adequately equipping our soldiers.

Sixty-five percent said the coalition government has changed UK foreign policy for the worse, with only 17 percent thinking they had improved it. Additionally, the highest amount of respondents (40 percent) said British foreign policy over the past year has damaged our reputation as a nation.

In line with the BNP''s party policy of non-inference in other countries’ disputes, 64 percent said Britain should not become involved in foreign uprisings, such as that in Libya, if they have no bearing on British interests. Twisted Evil
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MrDoodles
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Re: Cameron admits foreign aid has been wasted, yet plans to increase handouts by 34%

Post by redcorvette on Fri Jul 22, 2011 6:16 pm

MrDoodles wrote:David Cameron has admitted that billions of British foreign aid money has been ‘wasted’ yet defends its increase to £12 billion a year – meanwhile, polls show the majority of Britons want to see foreign aid and EU subsidies cut.

Speaking at the Pan-African university in Lagos on Tuesday, Cameron dismissed what he called ‘aid sceptics’’ views as ‘wrong’ and said foreign aid is ‘essential’.

In rather an understatement, the prime minister said: ‘There are some people back at home who don't like Britain's aid commitment.’

He continued: ‘They look at where some of our aid money has gone in recent years... on the wrong priorities and into the wrong hands. And think – this is all being wasted. They have a point – some of our money has been wasted.

‘The aid sceptics are wrong. Aid is essential. It can work, and we are making it work.’

Mr Cameron argued that the solution is not to cut aid but to change ‘the way it is delivered’. One way of doing this, he said, would be direct mobile-phoned-based payments to African farmers.

The ConDem regime has recently said it will donate almost £90 million to help victims of the Horn of Africa drought.

Neither South Africa nor Nigeria – two of the continent's biggest economies – has offered any aid to the Horn of Africa. The only African country to have done so is North Sudan.

The international aid budget is the only area of government spending that will rise significantly over the next few years, as frontline services in Britain are slashed across the board.

Foreign aid will increase to more than 12 billion pounds by 2014, making the UK one of the few countries in the world to meet its ‘international aid commitments’.

Meanwhile, back in Britain, a YouGov poll has shown the population’s continued opposition to foreign aid (and continued agreement with British National Party policies).

Fifty-seven percent of people surveyed in the ‘British Attitudes Towards the UK’s International Priorities’ poll believed Britain is sending too much aid to other countries, while only seven percent thought we send ‘too little’.

Fifty-seven percent also think that much development assistance is wasted and should be ‘radically reduced’.

Only 18 percent of people thought foreign aid serves Britain’s national interests around the world.

Again in line with British National Party policy, 64 percent said we contribute too much money to the EU, while just two percent said we give too little.

Seventy-seven percent of participants said they want our troops out of Afghanistan, while only 17 percent said they want them to remain. Sixty-four percent said our government is not adequately equipping our soldiers.

Sixty-five percent said the coalition government has changed UK foreign policy for the worse, with only 17 percent thinking they had improved it. Additionally, the highest amount of respondents (40 percent) said British foreign policy over the past year has damaged our reputation as a nation.

In line with the BNP''s party policy of non-inference in other countries’ disputes, 64 percent said Britain should not become involved in foreign uprisings, such as that in Libya, if they have no bearing on British interests. Twisted Evil

This is were Cameron shows himself up as an "very arrogant" know it all and will be his undoing.....he didn't listen about Coulson and now look what's happened and he and his ilk...forget it's the PUBLICS MONEY not their own..to give away...
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