Teachers reluctant to discuss 9/11

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Teachers reluctant to discuss 9/11

Post by Guest on Sat Jun 25, 2011 7:55 am

Teachers are reluctant to discuss the September 11 attacks on America because they fear it will provoke racism and Islamaphobia in class, according to a survey.



Those in schools with high numbers of Muslim children are particularly concerned about talking about the atrocity - despite it being arguably the defining event of the 21st century so far.

Alison Kitson, faculty director at the Institute of Education at London University, which carried out the survey, said teachers should "grasp the nettle" and tackle the subject. They should credit children with more maturity, she said.

Four in five teachers (81 per cent) said that when teaching the topic, it was a challenge to break "students' stereotypes and prejudices about other cultures". The academics polled almost 200 teachers across the country and also visited eight schools: four in London, and one each in Leeds, Worcestershire, Oxford and Surrey. At two schools, teachers showed "serious resistance" to raising the subject, while in another there was "some resistance" from staff.

Teachers in schools with higher proportions of children from ethnic minority backgrounds were most against discussing 9/11. The attacks, which happened a decade ago this September, killed almost 3,000 people. They also precipitated the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

However, teachers in inner-city schools said that raising the subject would cause "sensitivity" for Muslim or Afghan pupils, and strong feelings in those with family members or friends in the armed forces.

But Ms Kitson, who is also director of education for the 9/11 London Project, a charity devoted to teaching "a proper understanding of what happened", told the Times Education Supplement that teachers needed to "grasp the nettle". She said: "All teachers said the topic would cause sensitivity, despite their type of school. All said this was due to their intake of pupils, even if they had high proportions of Caribbean, Muslim, or white pupils. But children themselves were keen to avoid stereotypes when talking about the issue, and dealt with it in a much more mature way than teachers would give them credit for."

Almost two-thirds (64 per cent) of teachers said they had discussed September 11 in the last year, although only half said this was done as part of a formal lesson.

Dr David Starkey, the historian, said teachers were "frightened" of raising the issue but he added: "We should not pillory them." Their fear was derived from the fact that society as a whole now recoiled from discussing racially sensitive subjects - a matter he said needed to be addressed. "It's very easy to see why teachers are frightened of teaching this, which is what it really amounts to," he said. "But we should not pillory them. It would be very easy to target school teachers, but very wrong. I think until we are much much clearer - not just in schools but in public debate - that freedom of speech is valuable and can be a licence to offend, this will go on."

The survey, carried out on the charity's behalf, surveyed history, religious education, personal social and health education (PSHE), and citizenship teachers. Academics also interviewed staff from the British Council, the Association for Citizenship Teaching, the Citizenship Foundation and the Schools Linking Network, which works to build bridges between schools with different ethnic profiles.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/8596906/Teachers-reluctant-to-discuss-911.html



As children we tend to be less prejudiced and more open minded. Discussing these subjects when we are young can enable us to gain a much greater understanding of the world around us and different cultures. I think we're missing a golden opportunity if we choose to sweep these kinds of issues under the carpet. They need to be discussed and properly understood.

9/11 has had a massive effect on the world, we can't pretend it didn't happen just because it's a sensitive and emotive subject. It's important that future generations understand what happened study

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Re: Teachers reluctant to discuss 9/11

Post by Guest on Sat Jun 25, 2011 11:09 am

Exactly, after the WWII Germany had to teach about what happened there and why, its the only way we learn for goodness sake. Shying away from a subject never does any good.

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Re: Teachers reluctant to discuss 9/11

Post by SEXY MAMA on Mon Jun 27, 2011 10:18 am

sassy1261 wrote:Exactly, after the WWII Germany had to teach about what happened there and why, its the only way we learn for goodness sake. Shying away from a subject never does any good.

I agree Sass. You cannot brush it under the carpet as they say.
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Re: Teachers reluctant to discuss 9/11

Post by Guest on Mon Jun 27, 2011 6:49 pm

9/11 should certainly be mentioned as kids ought to be made aware of such atrocities and that fundamentalism is a bad road to take. Likewise however they should be taught about different beliefs and how Muslims use their faith to live 'generally' good moral lives.

These things need to be discussed and when better than in youth? Likley there will be Muslim children in many classes who can give their own interpreation of their faith to the benifit of their classmates. Teaching this things alongside 9/11 will give a more balanced education and demonstrate to kids how we should all stand together against evil.

But avoiding subjects altogether will only lead to further animosity in the future...

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Re: Teachers reluctant to discuss 9/11

Post by Guest on Tue Jun 28, 2011 5:30 pm

eilzel wrote:9/11 should certainly be mentioned as kids ought to be made aware of such atrocities and that fundamentalism is a bad road to take. Likewise however they should be taught about different beliefs and how Muslims use their faith to live 'generally' good moral lives.

These things need to be discussed and when better than in youth? Likley there will be Muslim children in many classes who can give their own interpreation of their faith to the benifit of their classmates. Teaching this things alongside 9/11 will give a more balanced education and demonstrate to kids how we should all stand together against evil.

But avoiding subjects altogether will only lead to further animosity in the future...

Hi Eilzel, a thanks from me, totally agree I love you x

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