Housing benefit changes 'could force 11,000 disabled people out of homes'

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Housing benefit changes 'could force 11,000 disabled people out of homes'

Post by Guest on Thu Jun 02, 2011 6:09 pm

Homeless charity Crisis says young disabled people who can no longer afford flats could end up being forced to live on the streets


Homeless charity Crisis says that the change to housing benefit could lead to more disabled people sleeping rough. Photograph: Charlotte Colman/Alamy

Controversial government changes to housing benefit could see 11,000 young disabled people forced out of their flats, putting them at risk of homelessness, according to campaigners. The homeless charity Crisis says the government's own figures (pdf) show that almost one in five of the 62,500 people in England, Scotland and Wales affected by the proposed extension of the Shared Accommodation Rate (SAR) have a disability.

From 1 January 2012, single people aged 25-34 will only be able to claim housing benefit based on the cost of a room in a shared house rather than a modest one-bed flat, bringing them into line with existing rates for people under 25. The average loss will be £41 a week.

This will force many disabled people into housing that is inappropriate for their condition, said Crisis.

Although 4,000 of the most vulnerable disabled claimants will be exempt because they need help through the day or night, most ill and disabled people will be forced to move into cheaper accommodation, often outside the area where they live.

In a survey of housing professionals published by Crisis last month, 87% said they already had problems finding appropriate properties for people on SAR and 72% believed there was not enough shared accommodation in their area.

Leslie Morphy, chief executive of Crisis, said: "This disturbing cut will force people suffering serious physical disabilities or mental illness to share with strangers, even if it damages their health. Government claims that discretionary funding will be able to support those who need it just don't add up. We are deeply concerned that some of the disabled people affected by this will end up homeless, and in the worst cases rough-sleeping."

James, 31, from Coventry, who is on incapacity benefit, faces a cut of £43 a week in his benefit, which will force him to leave the small one-bedroom flat he has lived in since 2008.

He has Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism; a hereditary condition that results in severe mobility problems; and has suffered from ulcerative colitis, a form of inflammatory bowel disease. He says his Asperger's makes it hard for him to live with strangers, and he fears that the stress of moving from his home will trigger health problems. He says there are no affordable one-bedroom flats where he lives. "I think it's going to be horrific. I just won't have the money to stay where I am. It will basically be 'look for the least terrible option'."

James says he is frustrated by being unable to work. He says he has applied for jobs without success. "One of the things I'm most frustrated by is people saying I'm workshy. This is not a 'lifestyle choice'. I'm not living in luxury at the taxpayer's expense, I'm living in penury at the taxpayer's expense, and I hate it, I hate living on handouts."

According to an equality impact assessment carried out by the Department for Work and Pensions, the average loss per week is £41, rising to £45 a week in the south east and £87 a week in London.

The highest losses will be incurred by young people renting in Camden (a loss of £116 a week), Brent (£111), Islington (£109), Tower Hamlets (£109) and Westminster (£108).

The Department for Work and Pensions said the measure, which it hopes will save £200m a year, was to ensure greater fairness so that people on housing benefit face similar "affordability choices" to those not on benefits.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2011/jun/02/housing-benefit-disabled-people-streets


Grrrrr!!!! This makes no sense whatsoever. Why is age a factor? Being disabled often means you need specific living requirements which would make it difficult to find a room in a shared house. Life is tough enough for the disabled. "Controversial Government changes"? Disgraceful Evil or Very Mad

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Re: Housing benefit changes 'could force 11,000 disabled people out of homes'

Post by victorismyhero on Thu Jun 02, 2011 6:22 pm

Feelthelove wrote:Homeless charity Crisis says young disabled people who can no longer afford flats could end up being forced to live on the streets


Homeless charity Crisis says that the change to housing benefit could lead to more disabled people sleeping rough. Photograph: Charlotte Colman/Alamy

Controversial government changes to housing benefit could see 11,000 young disabled people forced out of their flats, putting them at risk of homelessness, according to campaigners. The homeless charity Crisis says the government's own figures (pdf) show that almost one in five of the 62,500 people in England, Scotland and Wales affected by the proposed extension of the Shared Accommodation Rate (SAR) have a disability.

From 1 January 2012, single people aged 25-34 will only be able to claim housing benefit based on the cost of a room in a shared house rather than a modest one-bed flat, bringing them into line with existing rates for people under 25. The average loss will be £41 a week.

This will force many disabled people into housing that is inappropriate for their condition, said Crisis.

Although 4,000 of the most vulnerable disabled claimants will be exempt because they need help through the day or night, most ill and disabled people will be forced to move into cheaper accommodation, often outside the area where they live.

In a survey of housing professionals published by Crisis last month, 87% said they already had problems finding appropriate properties for people on SAR and 72% believed there was not enough shared accommodation in their area.

Leslie Morphy, chief executive of Crisis, said: "This disturbing cut will force people suffering serious physical disabilities or mental illness to share with strangers, even if it damages their health. Government claims that discretionary funding will be able to support those who need it just don't add up. We are deeply concerned that some of the disabled people affected by this will end up homeless, and in the worst cases rough-sleeping."

James, 31, from Coventry, who is on incapacity benefit, faces a cut of £43 a week in his benefit, which will force him to leave the small one-bedroom flat he has lived in since 2008.

He has Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism; a hereditary condition that results in severe mobility problems; and has suffered from ulcerative colitis, a form of inflammatory bowel disease. He says his Asperger's makes it hard for him to live with strangers, and he fears that the stress of moving from his home will trigger health problems. He says there are no affordable one-bedroom flats where he lives. "I think it's going to be horrific. I just won't have the money to stay where I am. It will basically be 'look for the least terrible option'."

James says he is frustrated by being unable to work. He says he has applied for jobs without success. "One of the things I'm most frustrated by is people saying I'm workshy. This is not a 'lifestyle choice'. I'm not living in luxury at the taxpayer's expense, I'm living in penury at the taxpayer's expense, and I hate it, I hate living on handouts."

According to an equality impact assessment carried out by the Department for Work and Pensions, the average loss per week is £41, rising to £45 a week in the south east and £87 a week in London.

The highest losses will be incurred by young people renting in Camden (a loss of £116 a week), Brent (£111), Islington (£109), Tower Hamlets (£109) and Westminster (£108).

The Department for Work and Pensions said the measure, which it hopes will save £200m a year, was to ensure greater fairness so that people on housing benefit face similar "affordability choices" to those not on benefits.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2011/jun/02/housing-benefit-disabled-people-streets


Grrrrr!!!! This makes no sense whatsoever. Why is age a factor? Being disabled often means you need specific living requirements which would make it difficult to find a room in a shared house. Life is tough enough for the disabled. "Controversial Government changes"? Disgraceful Evil or Very Mad

but of course, as we know from the increasingly hysterical tone of politicians from the last govt down to this one...the "we're all in it together" brigade.....these young disabled are really parasitic scroungers, who will be homeless through their own choice.... Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad

just like the 1000's of others who are looking to have their benefits scrapped, and/or be forced to do work which will most likely only make their condition worse. The govt is of course aided and abeted in this by dishonourable medics. It is also to be noted that when forced to work the disabled worker is liable to be taken on at a lower rate for the same job, but will be expected to perform as well as an able bodied person. A licence for exploitation..... Evil or Very Mad
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Re: Housing benefit changes 'could force 11,000 disabled people out of homes'

Post by Guest on Thu Jun 02, 2011 6:29 pm

victorismyhero wrote:

but of course, as we know from the increasingly hysterical tone of politicians from the last govt down to this one...the "we're all in it together" brigade.....these young disabled are really parasitic scroungers, who will be homeless through their own choice.... Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad

just like the 1000's of others who are looking to have their benefits scrapped, and/or be forced to do work which will most likely only make their condition worse. The govt is of course aided and abeted in this by dishonourable medics. It is also to be noted that when forced to work the disabled worker is liable to be taken on at a lower rate for the same job, but will be expected to perform as well as an able bodied person. A licence for exploitation..... Evil or Very Mad

Honestly Victor, I thought I would explode when I read this story. I won't repeat my language, you'd be shocked! Evil or Very Mad

For the love of God, these are people I would expect to receive help. I'm all for saving money but not like this Crying or Very sad

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Re: Housing benefit changes 'could force 11,000 disabled people out of homes'

Post by victorismyhero on Thu Jun 02, 2011 6:42 pm

Feelthelove wrote:

Honestly Victor, I thought I would explode when I read this story. I won't repeat my language, you'd be shocked! Evil or Very Mad

For the love of God, these are people I would expect to receive help. I'm all for saving money but not like this Crying or Very sad

Well FTL, I'm sure that there are loads of proud voters out there who will be ecstatic about this, it must be said though that labours plans were little better.....

as Mr D and I keep saying ...Folks WILL keep voting for the same old same old.......
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Re: Housing benefit changes 'could force 11,000 disabled people out of homes'

Post by Guest on Thu Jun 02, 2011 8:46 pm

Or of course, Landlords will have to accept the lower rents! Twisted Evil

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Re: Housing benefit changes 'could force 11,000 disabled people out of homes'

Post by Guest on Fri Jun 03, 2011 8:22 am

Yes MrD, the knock-on effect is going to force the many greedy landlords out there to accept more realistic rents.

The people immediately affected should go to their local fair rents officer if they feel they are being overcharged.

Its been a bad week for housing for the vulnerable with asset strippers Stephen Schwarzman and his investment bankers forcing Southern Cross to go under. It should be illegal for investment bankers to make a billion pounds out of old peoples homes.

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Re: Housing benefit changes 'could force 11,000 disabled people out of homes'

Post by Guest on Fri Jun 03, 2011 10:47 pm

Seren wrote:Yes MrD, the knock-on effect is going to force the many greedy landlords out there to accept more realistic rents.

The people immediately affected should go to their local fair rents officer if they feel they are being overcharged.

Its been a bad week for housing for the vulnerable with asset strippers Stephen Schwarzman and his investment bankers forcing Southern Cross to go under. It should be illegal for investment bankers to make a billion pounds out of old peoples homes.

You know my feelings on that one! Twisted Evil

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