Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

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Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by Guest on Thu 26 May 2011 - 14:40

Fantastic news! Twisted Evil

The crimes this man committed are beyond humanity! Crying or Very sad

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Ratko-Mladic-Serbian-Police-Arrest-Man-Believed-To-Be-Alleged-War-Criminal-According-To-Reports/Article/201105416000143?lpos=World_News_Carousel_Region_0&lid=ARTICLE_16000143_Ratko_Mladic%3A_Serbian_Police_Arrest_Man_Believed_To_Be_Alleged_War_Criminal%2C_According_To_Reports

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Ratko Mladic deemed fit for extradition to UN tribunal

Post by Guest on Fri 27 May 2011 - 14:07

Serbian court rules former Bosnian Serb general is healthy enough to stand trial in The Hague, despite defence's protests


Ratko Mladic in 1993. Photograph: Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images

Efforts to put Europe's most-wanted war crimes suspect on trial in the Hague crossed their first hurdle today when a Belgrade court ruled that Ratko Mladic was fit to be extradited. A spokeswoman said the court had determined that Mladic was well enough to stand trial, despite claims from his defence team that the 69-year old was in poor health.

The ruling clears the way for Mladic to be transfered to the international criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, where he faces 15 charges, including genocide and murder.

Mladic's defence team now have three days to launch an appeal, which is likely to focus on his health conditions.

The former general's son said on Friday that Mladic was too ill for extradition after suffering two strokes while on the run. "We are almost certain he cannot be extradited in such condition," Darko Mladic told reporters after visiting his father in the Belgrade prison where he is being held.

"He is in very bad shape. His right arm is half paralysed. His right side is partly numb," Mladic Jr said, adding that the family had requested that Mladic should be transferred to a military hospital. The family called on Russia to send an independent medical team to examine him and guarantee the impartiality of any medical assessment.

Mladic, who earned a fearsome reputation as the "butcher of Bosnia" was brought before the court on Friday after his arrest in a north Serbian village 16 years after commanding the worst atrocity on the continent since the Nazi era.

Mladic Jr refused to discuss any events during the 16-year period his father was in hiding, but said the former Serbian military commander denied the charges against him. "His stand is that he's not guilty of what he's being accused of," he said.

Russia, which strongly opposed the 1999 Nato airstrikes against Serbia over Kosovo, called for Mladic to recieve a fair trial, and said the case should not be used by the ICTY to justify prolonging its work.

"There are doubts that the trial of Mladic in the UN war crimes tribunal will be 100% objective and just," said Konstantin Kosachyov, who heads the international affairs committee in Russia's parliament.

War crimes prosecutors hoped Mladic would appear before the examining judge again on Friday to complete the first stage of the extradition process. This will be followed by a three-day gap and Mladic will have three days after that to decide whether to appeal. The Serbian ministry of justice will then determine the extradition request. Authorities in The Hague expect Mladic to be there next week and will give him a full medical examination.

The surprise arrest of Mladic, who is wanted for the mass murder of almost 8,000 men and boys in Srebrenica, turned a page in the history of the Balkans, offering Serbia closure on decades as a virtual international pariah and giving the country a chance to take its place as a pivotal regional democracy eventually anchored in the European Union.

The 69-year-old retired general, who commanded the Bosnian Serb military during the 1992-95 war, was taken to Belgrade after being arrested at a cousin's home in Lazarevo, north-east of Belgrade.

When Mladic appeared in court on Thursday night, he looked frail and walked slowly. He wore a baseball cap and could be heard on state TV saying "good day" to those present.

Mladic's lawyer said the judge cut short the questioning because the suspect's "poor physical state" left him unable to communicate. "He is aware he is under arrest, he knows where he is, and he said he does not recognise The Hague tribunal," Milos Saljic said.

The deputy war crimes prosecutor Bruno Vekaric said Mladic was taking a lot of medicine, but "responds very rationally to everything that is going on".

More details have emerged of the capture of Mladic, who had been living under the alias Milorad Komadic. According to officials in Belgrade and accounts to the Serbian media, Mladic wore no disguise and put up no resistance when detained by the Serbian security services and Serbian war crimes unit. "I am the person you are looking for," he reportedly said when arrested in part of a cottage once occupied by the now dead parents of his cousin Branko Mladic.

He is said to have been dressed in multiple layers of clothing, including pullovers, although it is summer in Serbia. He had his own identity card, although it formally expired in 1999. There were two guns at the property. Asked why Mladic did not resist arrest, his lawyer is reported to have said the officers were "just children", in other words very young.

Reports about his life there differ. One version holds that he spent a lot of time indoors, while one 20-year-old has claimed to a newpaper that he had worked for a time in the nearby industrial town of Zrenjanin.

After his arrest, Mladic indicated that he had been following media reports of the war crimes prosecutors' long pursuit of him.

On Thursday night residents took to the streets to show their support for Mladic, singing Serbian nationalist songs. "To us, Mladic is a hero, a military hero," said one, who would only give his name as Paul. "He protected us from Croatia, Bosnia Herzegovina, even Slovenia. He saved our families."

The image of a frail and sickly rural retiree was a far cry from the strutting, imperious commander of the 1990s who was a monstrous figure to the Muslims of Bosnia. His name is synonymous with the Srebrenica massacre of July 1995 when Mladic's forces overran the Bosnian Muslim "safe haven" hill town, then methodically rounded up the males and murdered almost 8,000.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/may/27/ratko-mladic-extradition-un-tribunal

Pure evil Evil or Very Mad

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Ratko Mladic says all Serbs must share the guilt

Post by Guest on Sun 29 May 2011 - 10:23

It was Milosevic's fault, says the man charged with orchestrating the biggest massacre in Europe since the last world war


Ratko Mladic has been given a TV and strawberries in jail and has received family visits. Photograph: Ho/AP

Ratko Mladic delivered a tirade of abuse against officials involved in his capture when he was first brought to court, the Observer has learned. He accused them of "working for the CIA" and later remarked chillingly to one prominent official that he could have had him killed on two occasions.

Mladic, who has refused to recognise the authority of the UN war crimes tribunal in The Hague, where he is expected to be extradited to this week on charges of genocide, also denied being a killer, adding that all Serbs bore a shared guilt for voting for President Slobodan Milosevic, architect of the Balkan wars.

How Mladic has behaved since being brought to a Belgrade court was disclosed in the most detailed account yet of the state of mind of the man charged with orchestrating the Srebrenica massacre and the siege of Sarajevo during the Bosnian war.

It came as a source close to Serbia's intelligence service, the BIA – or Security Information Agency – said Mladic had been living openly, although "not continuously", in the village of Lazarevo, where he was found, for several years. A BIA team observing the house of Branko Mladic, where Ratko Mladic was found, in one of two addresses he had been using in the area, had watched him going about "everyday activities" including helping his cousin Branko on the farm and attending village celebrations. "Personally speaking," said the source, "I think some officials knew where he was living. It was peculiar, too, that when the house was raided that there were no personal possessions there."

Mladic's behaviour since capture was described by Bruno Vekaric, a deputy prosecutor at the War Crimes Prosecutor's Office, who has met Mladic twice since his arrest in Lazarevo on Thursday. "He was really angry at first. He recognised me from television and said: 'You're in the CIA!' He knew my name and asked me: 'Are you a Serb?' You know, because it is not a common Serbian name. I told him my father was from Dubrovnik [in Croatia]. He felt like a great Serb and was angry at the way he was being treated on that first day."

Vekaric added that examination of Mladic by court-appointed medical experts confirmed that he had suffered at least two minor strokes, perhaps more, but was coherent and fit to stand trial. That was confirmed by his wife, Bosiljka, speaking after visiting Mladic, who said he had suffered a stroke in 2008.

"He was stubborn and resistant. He did not want to co-operate with the judge at all on the first day," said Vekaric. "He spoke about his career. And what was interesting – on that first day – was that he said to me: 'Bruno, I am not a killer. But the people who killed, they should be held responsible'."

Vekaric gave his account in his court office above the cells where Mladic is being held in a block on his own, watched 24 hours by two guards through an open door. He described a vivid psychological profile of the man who spent 16 years on the run. "He's always observed," said Vekaric, "but he's told the guards: 'You don't have to worry. I'm not going to commit suicide'."

Mladic emerges from the account as a man who has a desperate need to explain himself. "He needs to speak. To communicate," said Vekaric. "He was alone for so long he needs to speak."

Although they had never met before, Mladic made clear to Vekaric that he had followed his statements over the years on television. "The first day he was very tired. He was stressed and aggressive. The second time I saw him in court he apologised to me for his outburst."

What has been visible since then is a more familiar Mladic, arrogant and demanding, insisting not only on his own innocence but on the shared guilt of all of the Serbian people. "He said: 'You elected [Slobodan] Milosevic, not me. You are all guilty, not me'."

During his time in court, speaking to officials on the margins of the proceedings to extradite him to The Hague for trial, some details have emerged of how Mladic has lived. He has had no mobile phone – not trusting it or the internet. The television channels that he watched were local Serbian ones, describing cable television as "fed by the CIA".

Mladic has delivered recriminations, too, over how his family has been treated during the long manhunt. "He asked for his pension [cut off in 2004] to be reinstated. He said: 'You destroyed everything. Because of you my daughter-in-law lost her job. They destroyed the financial connections of my son Darko'," Vekaric said. He added that as well as asking for strawberries and a television, which has been delivered to his cell, Mladic had asked to visit the grave of his daughter, Anna, who committed suicide in 1994, and had also asked if he could see his grandchildren.

Vekaric added that Mladic had suffered increasingly straitened circumstances since 2006 – when he narrowly evaded arrest in the village of Ljuba. This was as a result of the targeting of those in his support network, including financiers, and increased supervision of family members, who had been followed closely by the BIA. "He only had relatives who could look after him," said the source familiar with the BIA operation to capture him. "None of his close family visited him in Lazarevo while the house was being observed. They were being watched too closely."

"When you see him," said Vekaric, "you see a man who was not looked after himself well in the last three to four years. He looks like someone who has not had proper medical attention in a long time."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/may/28/ratko-mladic-serbs-share-guilt

There is always someone else to blame isn't there No

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Re: Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by Guest on Sun 29 May 2011 - 11:24

Of course, just to play Devils advocate, you could always say that he was just a Nationalist protecting his own kind, in his own land! Twisted Evil

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Re: Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by Guest on Sun 29 May 2011 - 13:19

MrDoodles wrote:Of course, just to play Devils advocate, you could always say that he was just a Nationalist protecting his own kind, in his own land! Twisted Evil

But aren't you a Nationalist Mr Doodles???? Wink


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Re: Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by Guest on Sun 29 May 2011 - 23:33

Feelthelove wrote:

But aren't you a Nationalist Mr Doodles???? Wink


Yes and you could argue that he was just trying to keep the evil of Islam out of his own Country! Wink

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Re: Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by Guest on Mon 30 May 2011 - 15:31

MrDoodles wrote:

Yes and you could argue that he was just trying to keep the evil of Islam out of his own Country! Wink

A world apart from your first post!

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Re: Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by Guest on Mon 30 May 2011 - 15:43

I've been reading up on this since the arrest and the situation there is very different to here where until recently the UK was 99% Anglo/Celt. The pockets of either Serb/Croat/Bosnian are littered throughout the country and there has been a strong Muslim presence in the country for many years. It can't be classed merely as nationalism here.

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Re: Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by Guest on Tue 31 May 2011 - 16:23

sassy1261 wrote:

A world apart from your first post!

That's as maybe, I did say that I was playing devils advocate! Twisted Evil

To a lot of his own people, he is a hero for standing up for their own kind and eradicating 8,000 of what they see as "Islamist Infestation" Twisted Evil

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Re: Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by victorismyhero on Wed 1 Jun 2011 - 21:14

MrDoodles wrote:

That's as maybe, I did say that I was playing devils advocate! Twisted Evil

To a lot of his own people, he is a hero for standing up for their own kind and eradicating 8,000 of what they see as "Islamist Infestation" Twisted Evil

Are you SURE you are just being ole nicks advocate......and not his lowness himself Very Happy Very Happy Shocked
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Mladic Moved To Prison Hospital At The Hague

Post by Guest on Thu 2 Jun 2011 - 18:36

Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect and former general, has been moved to the prison hospital in The Hague, his lawyer has revealed.


Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect Mladic is in prison hospital

Having been extradited to the Netherlands on Tuesday, the 69-year-old's health has apparently deteriorated due to long years of neglect. "Ratko Mladic is in the prison hospital," Belgrade lawyer Aleksandar Aleksic told Reuters news agency in The Hague, where Mladic is to go on trial on war crimes charges. He has not had proper health care for years and his condition is not good."

Mladic had lost the use of one hand due to a stroke suffered years ago, Mr Aleksic confirmed, but he said that his client was mentally capable and responsive.

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Ratko-Mladic-The-Bosnian-Serb-War-Crimes-Suspect-Has-Been-Moved-To-Prison-Hospital-In-The-Hague/Article/201106116004544?lpos=World_News_First_World_News_Article_Teaser_Region_0&lid=ARTICLE_16004544_Ratko_Mladic%2C_The_Bosnian_Serb_War_Crimes_Suspect%2C_Has_Been_Moved_To_Prison_Hospital_In_The_Hague


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Re: Ratko Mladic Arrested By Serbian Police

Post by victorismyhero on Thu 2 Jun 2011 - 19:47

Feelthelove wrote:Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect and former general, has been moved to the prison hospital in The Hague, his lawyer has revealed.


Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect Mladic is in prison hospital

Having been extradited to the Netherlands on Tuesday, the 69-year-old's health has apparently deteriorated due to long years of neglect. "Ratko Mladic is in the prison hospital," Belgrade lawyer Aleksandar Aleksic told Reuters news agency in The Hague, where Mladic is to go on trial on war crimes charges. He has not had proper health care for years and his condition is not good."

Mladic had lost the use of one hand due to a stroke suffered years ago, Mr Aleksic confirmed, but he said that his client was mentally capable and responsive.

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Ratko-Mladic-The-Bosnian-Serb-War-Crimes-Suspect-Has-Been-Moved-To-Prison-Hospital-In-The-Hague/Article/201106116004544?lpos=World_News_First_World_News_Article_Teaser_Region_0&lid=ARTICLE_16004544_Ratko_Mladic%2C_The_Bosnian_Serb_War_Crimes_Suspect%2C_Has_Been_Moved_To_Prison_Hospital_In_The_Hague


Why is it .............that when these bastards are finally brought to justice they all plead ...too ill to plead????????? aww...my heart bleeds for him
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Ratko Mladic, truculent and smirking, faces his accusers at The Hague

Post by Guest on Fri 3 Jun 2011 - 21:38

After 16-year wait, Srebrenica's women come face to face with commander accused of slaughtering their men and boys


Ratko Mladic caused consternation among alleged victims' families during the open of his trial by asking for two months to consider the charges against him Photograph: Serge Ligtenberg/Getty Images

Munira Subasic last saw Ratko Mladic at Srebrenica in 1995, when she begged him to leave her ill son alone. On Friday, 16 years on and with her son still missing, presumed dead, in a massacre that claimed more than 7,000 lives, Subasic came face to face again with the Bosnian Serb commander accused of the atrocity. "He lied to me and took my son to his death," she said outside the international criminal tribunal for the former Yugoslavia at The Hague, where Mladic was arraigned on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. "I come here today to see the butcher again and to see if his eyes are bloody, because they were bloody in 1995," she added.

Just after 10am, as the blinds rose on the partition separating the packed public gallery from court one, Subasic got to find out. There stood Mladic, flanked by UN security guards and defiantly saluting his victims, their families, interested diplomats and the world's media. He wore a grey military-style cap, suit and tie. Seemingly determined to present himself as a military leader and not the criminal that the prosecution accuses him of being, Mladic turned to salute the judge.

It was the opening act of an extraordinary performance in which the 69-year-old expressed deep pride in his actions and no remorse. He even taunted his alleged victims and their families, including Subasic and a group of other Bosnian Muslim victims. He described the charges against him as "obnoxious", refused to enter a plea of guilty or not guilty and described the indictment as "monstrous words that I have never heard before".

In a trial that could take years, Mladic caused consternation among the victims' families by asking for two months to consider the 11 counts of genocide, crimes against humanity and violations of the laws and customs of war during his time as commander of the army under the Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic.

The charges relate to the massacre at Srebrenica, where more than 7,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys were killed by Mladic's forces, the shelling and sniping operation against Sarajevo, during which thousands of civilians were killed or injured, wider "ethnic cleansing", and taking hostage 200 UN peacekeepers and military observers to use as human shields.

Claims had circulated this week that Mladic was at death's door, with his lawyer in Serbia warning that his client might even die before the trial could begin. There were reports that Mladic had been treated for cancer in 2009. "I am a gravely ill man," he told the judge.

But from appearances, the defendant at The Hague did not seem like a man at death's door. He was alert and responsive and held his head high with a jutted-out jaw reminiscent of the days when he led the Bosnian Serb army. Movement in his right hand appeared to be slightly inhibited and he needed help to put on his translation headphones. But he was mobile, at various points clapping his hands, waving his fist while addressing the judge, and even making a T-shape with his arms to call for a timeout as if he were a basketball or baseball coach. His speech was slightly slurred, but he seemed like a general who wanted to remain in control.

Asked if he wanted to hear the full indictment against him, Mladic told the presiding judge, Alphons Orie: "I do not want to hear a single letter or sentence of that indictment read out to me."

The judge ignored him and read a summary of the charges which, even in its abbreviated form, took 21 minutes.

Mladic's pride seemed to be wounded by his treatment and in one of several outbursts he said he would have preferred to have been killed than handled, as he was in the Netherlands, by masked police.

"When I saw the balaclavas worn by these people I don't like that," he said. "I would rather be killed by a policeman either here or in the US or anywhere. If they were to kill me, Ratko Mladic, so that it could be reported in the press, fine, but I defended my country. I am Ratko Mladic, I did not kill Croats as Croats, and I am not killing anyone in Libya or in Africa … I was just defending my country."

When the judge said "the accused shall be innocent until proved guilty," Mladic nodded, smirked towards the gallery and stroked his stubble.

Throughout, the chief prosecutor of the court who has arranged the case against Mladic, Belgian lawyer Serge Brammertz, looked on impassively. The most highly charged moments of the hearing took place off camera. Time and again, Mladic turned to the public gallery, where Subasic sat with four other women who between them lost several dozen family members, including children, siblings and husbands at Srebrenica. After the indictment was read out, he fixed the gaze of Kada Hotic, who had lost her son, husband and two brothers.

During an exchange between him and Hotic through the glass he could be seen waving his finger at her and smiling. She said that he made a gesture to her with his thumb and forefinger indicating that she was small.

"I looked through the glass and said to him, I want you to know that you murdered my only son," Hotic said emotionally after Friday's hearing concluded.

On another occasion, as the judge addressed Mladic about the procedure, the defendant appeared to switch off and turned to the victims again, smirking and nodding at them.

One of them, Bakira Hascic, had been raped by Bosnian Serb forces and in total lost 27 members of her extended family. Munira Subusic lost 22 members of her family, including her youngest son, whose remains have never been found. Several times during the one hour, 40 minute hearing they had to be calmed down gently by the UN security guards. "I am very unsatisfied because I feel too much time is given to him and the court is pleasing him too much," said Zumra Sehonerovic, who lost her son and other members of her family. "He doesn't need time to remember what he did. He knows it well."

Asked about his repeated gestures, grins and smirks towards the victims, she said it brought back memories of seeing him at Srebrenica.

"He was doing the same thing in 1995 when he came to Srebrenica," she said. "It reminded me of all the crimes he committed in 1995. My dear wish is that he is condemned and sentenced for the crimes he has committed. I won't worry too much about his health. I would have been happier if he had been arrested 10 years before. It would have been much more important for us the victims."

Subasic added: "As a victim, I hope he lives a long life and feels the pain and to know what it is like to live with such a burden he gave us."

The judge set a date for a second appearance on 4 July, by which time Mladic will be expected to enter a plea. He told Mladic he would be returned to UN custody until then.

As the blinds came down Mladic waved again to the gallery, put on his hat, and was helped out of his chair and to his feet. He then gave a final salute to the public.

The victims could contain themselves no longer and called out clearly in Bosnian: "Butcher!"

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/03/ratko-mladic-defiant-faces-accusers


What an evil b'stard. How his victims contained themselves I'll never know. I think I'd have struggled not to kill him myself. How can he live with himself? Evil or Very Mad

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